Autumn Blaze

Published:
04/07/2019

Dwarf Native Fuchsia (Correa pulchella ‘Autumn Blaze’) is a native shrub endemic to the south-eastern regions of Australia.
This perennial, with glossy, green foliage, reaches a height of about 30 centimetres and spreads up to 1.5 metres wide. From autumn to early spring, it displays masses of brilliant, orange flowers that are attractive to honey-eating birds. 
Grow this low-growing beauty in a sunny or partly shaded spot in organic-enriched soil that is well-draining. It looks sensational mass-planted in gardens, rockeries or embankments.
Drought tolerant once established, the Dwarf Native Fuchsia is low maintenance - only needing an occasional long soak during extended periods of heat. 
To retain its neat appearance, simply prune by up to a third of its overall size after flowering in spring and feed with a slow-release fertiliser suitable for Australian native plants.
For a stunning effect in a perennial border, combine plantings of Dwarf Native Fuchsia with other native plants such as the Dwarf Mat Rush (Lomandra ‘Little Con’) and Black-eyed Susan (Tetratheca ‘Fairy Bells’).

Top gardening tips for May

  • Spoil that special someone on Mothers’ Day. Traditional gardening gifts include chrysanthemums, cyclamens and African violets. 
  • Condition the soil by digging in some well-rotted compost or organic matter to fork-depth and plant new season’s vegetables such as cabbage, broad beans, broccoli and spinach. 
  • Plant spring-flowering bulbs, such as hyacinths and tulips in pots. Grow some annual seedlings of pansy, viola or primula on top of the potting mix and you’ll have colourful flowers while you’re waiting for the bulbs to bloom.
  • Delight in the beauty of autumn with the changing shades of deciduous trees. Oaks, maples and liquid ambers show off some of their best colours this time of year. 
  • Top up the mulch on all garden beds to a depth of at least five centimetres, especially around shallow-rooted plants such as azaleas, rhododendrons, camellias and magnolias. 
  • Cut back autumn-blooming perennials as soon as the flowers have finished to prevent them self-seeding. Lift clumps of dahlias when they have died down and store them in a cool, dry place for planting out in spring.

 

Author:
Judith Sleijpen

Sign-up for the latest local Deals, Promotions & Events