Pure White

Published:
04/07/2019

Commonly known as Sandwort, Arenaria ‘Montana Snow’ is a native to the mountainous regions of south-western Europe.

Its name is derived from Latin – ‘arena’ means sand, while the species ‘montana’ refers to mountains.

This mounding, evergreen groundcover grows to a height of about 15 centimetres and spreads up to 80 centimetres wide. From spring into summer, its narrow, glossy leaves are smothered with masses of pristine, white flowers. 

Montana Snow prefers to grow in a sunny spot in fertile, well-drained soil. It’s ideal for the front of mixed perennial borders, small or narrow spaces, edging paths and driveways. Combined with Phlox (Phlox ‘Pink Cloak) and Society Garlic (Tulbaghia ‘Dark Star’), it creates a beautiful romantic mix.

It cascades gracefully over rockeries, embankments and retaining walls and looks stunning planted in premium grade potting mix in decorative containers.

This plant is low maintenance and easy to grow. Simply water deeply during extended periods of heat and apply a slow-release fertiliser after flowering.

Top gardening tips for February

  • Move pot plants and hanging baskets into a cool, shaded spot to prevent them becoming stressed when it’s hot and windy. Apply sealant to the inside of terracotta containers to reduce evaporation and add water-storage crystals to potting mix for extra moisture retention.
  • Trim climbers such as wisteria, jasmine and grape vines. These vigorous growers tend to take over during the warmer months and may need to be pruned. 
  • Prune back fuchsias that have finished their first main flush of flowers and trim straggly native plants to maintain an attractive shape. 
  • Watch out for black spot on rose bushes. This fungal disease causes mottling on the leaves and is more prevalent in high humidity. Gather up any affected foliage and place it in your garbage bin. Don’t add it to your compost heap. Spray your roses with an organic fungicide. 

 

Author:
Judith Sleijpen

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